Going the Extra Mile: How to Make Your Clients Feel Valued

/, Wellness/Going the Extra Mile: How to Make Your Clients Feel Valued

When you think about the best customer service experience you’ve had, what comes to mind? Whether your experience includes a detail-oriented waiter at your favorite restaurant, a phone call with helpful customer service representative, or a great meeting with your financial advisor, one thing remains the same–you walked away from the interaction feeling informed and valued.

This same idea can be translated to your small law firm’s legal clients. You want your clients to feel like you’re providing them with the best customer service possible, but how do you make them feel secure in that?

Here are three ways you can go the extra mile to make your clients feel valued:

  • Provide explanations. If you’ve been working in the legal industry for years, it’s sometimes easy to forget all of your clients come to you with different degrees of knowledge about the legal process. Take the time to figure out their level of understanding and explain what they can expect in the process. As their matter progresses or evolves, make sure to communicate what is happening and why it’s happening. This level of communication informs your clients and helps you build trust–an important part of the lawyer-client relationship.
  • Stay on top of your matters. This one should go without saying, but with the volume of clients and daily to-dos lawyers must deal with, sometimes a thing or two can slip through the cracks. Doing simple things like planning out all of your tasks a week in advance and creating calendar reminders for important dates will keep you on track and shows your client they’re a priority of yours.
  • Get feedback and act on it. Not sure how your clients feel about the services your small firm provides? Ask them! Asking clients for feedback and implementing their suggestions is an excellent way to show your firm cares about their opinion and is committed to improving client service.
By | February 24th, 2015|

About the Author:

For years, Josh has helped lawyers become more organized, productive, and profitable. A trained litigator, Josh came to Smokeball from a large east-coast law firm where his practice focused on franchise, insurance, marine, and general litigation. His work with Smokeball, and his continued passion for what he does each day, is driven by a desire to help lawyers and their staff do better in every way. Knowing well the stress and strain put on today’s legal professional, he regularly focuses on improving work and life in the law. He has traveled the country working with and learning from lawyers and their staff. Josh speaks regularly to bar associations about successful law firm practices and other legal topics. Recent notable engagements have been with the Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, and the Missouri Bar’s Solo and Small Firm Conference. In addition to his work at Smokeball, Josh serves on the Writing Resource Center staff at The John Marshall Law School. Besides legal technology, his research interests include judicial decision-making, jury decision-making and psychology, and legal writing. He has written and overseen research exploring causal effects of sex/gender on federal appellate court decision-making, and assisted with research for a forthcoming textbook on judicial decision-making. Additionally, Josh sits on the Board of Chicago Fringe Opera Company. Josh holds his J.D., cum laude, from Washington University in St. Louis, where he served as a Senior Editor of the Wash. U. Law Review, held the prestigious Thompson Coburn Research Fellowship, served as Research Assistant to then-Vice-Dean (now Chancellor) Andrew D. Martin, and clerked at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. He holds a B.A. in Political Science and a B.M. in Music Performance with Honors Scholar distinction from the University of Connecticut, making him a Huskies basketball fan through and through. Follow Josh’s activity on LinkedIn, and keep up with new articles on the Smokeball Blog.

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